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Good (Thanksgiving) Reads

Riverscape Blog, Odenton, MD  It's the long Thanksgiving weekend, and what better to do than escape into the past with a good book? We've got suggestions.

There aren’t enough long weekends in the calendar year, but with Thanksgiving being on a Thursday, we have the luxury of indulging in a free weekend. If you are planning on staying in Odenton, MD, for the holiday, this could be the perfect time to cozy up in your Riverscape apartment and read (or perhaps for some, to re-read) a book. We’ve got some suggestions related to Thanksgiving and life during the early history of the United States with descriptions from Goodreads.com.

 

Thanksgiving: The True Story by Penny Colman

“Every year on the fourth Thursday of November, Americans celebrate with a Thanksgiving meal. But what is the origin of this tradition? Did it really begin when the Pilgrims and Native Americans got together in 1621 in Plymouth,Massachusetts?

 

“In her signature narrative nonfiction style, Penny Colman paints a fascinating picture of this cherished American holiday. She examines numerous Thanksgiving claims which were antecedents to the national holiday we celebrate today, raises the turkey question—does everyone eat turkey on Thanksgiving?—and shows Sarah Josepha Hale's instrumental role in establishing the holiday. Get ready to delve into the rich past of Thanksgiving in an enlightening history that uncovers the true story.”

 

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

“I believe that the reader will discover here the essential nature of one of the strangest and most awful chapters in human history," Arthur Miller wrote of his classic play about the witch-hunts and trials in seventeenth-century Salem, Massachusetts.

 

Based on historical people and real events, Miller's drama is a searing portrait of a community engulfed by hysteria. In the rigid theocracy of Salem, rumors that women are practicing witchcraft galvanize the town's most basic fears and suspicions; and when a young girl accuses Elizabeth Proctor of being a witch, self-righteous church leaders and townspeople insist that Elizabeth be brought to trial. The ruthlessness of the prosecutors and the eagerness of neighbor to testify against neighbor brilliantly illuminate the destructive power of socially sanctioned violence.

 

The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper

“The wild rush of action in this classic frontier adventure story has made The Last of the Mohicans the most popular of James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales. Deep in the forests of upper New York State, the brave woodsman Hawkeye (Natty Bumppo) and his loyal Mohican friends Chingachgook and Uncas become embroiled in the bloody battles of the French and Indian War. The abduction of the beautiful Munro sisters by hostile savages, the treachery of the renegade brave Magua, the ambush of innocent settlers, and the thrilling events that lead to the final tragic confrontation between rival war parties create an unforgettable, spine-tingling picture of life on the frontier. And as the idyllic wilderness gives way to the forces of civilization, the novel presents a moving portrayal of a vanishing race and the end of its way of life in the great American forests.”

 

What are your favorite American history books? Please share in the comments so we can all check them out. Happy Thanksgiving from the Riverscape blog!